FILE - This April 1, 2014 file photo shows the ignition switch of a 2005 Chevrolet Cobalt in Alexandria, Va. The ignition switch on the Cobalt and other small cars was so poorly designed that it easily slipped out of the run position, causing engines to stall. Engineers knew it; as early as 2004, a Cobalt stalled on a GM test track when the driver's knee grazed the key fob. By GM's admission, the defective switches caused over 50 crashes and at least 27 deaths. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

GM ignition switch deaths rise to 27

GM knew about faulty ignition switches in Chevrolet Cobalts and other small cars for more than a decade but didn’t recall them until Februar…

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Submit your winter weather memories

Were you snowed in from a big event? Did you take an impromptu vacation just to get away from the cold? Did you feel like you were going to …

FILE - A sign points to the entrance to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where U.S. Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan was being treated, in this Oct. 8, 2014 file photo, in Dallas. Health officials said Sunday Oct. 12, 2014 a health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who provided care for Eric Duncan has tested positive for Ebola in a preliminary test "confirmatory testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta." (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Can all US hospitals safely treat Ebola?

Another federal official has suggested it was worth rethinking whether to send patients to one of the specialized units set up to deal with …