Water from Ward Lake floods the the trail encircling it Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, near Ketchikan, Alaska. The remnants of tropical storm Hurricane Oho are expected to bring more heavy rains and gusty winds to parts of southeast Alaska on Friday in what is a rare weather event. (Taylor Balkom/Ketchikan Daily News via AP)

In rare event, remnants of Pacific hurricane hit Alaska

Remnants of Pacific Hurricane Oho battered Alaska’s southeast coast on Friday, the latest unusual weather event to hit a state that so far this year has dealt with a lack of snow, warmer temperatures and intense wildfires.

Cars head toward the railroad underpass in Spartanburg, S.C., where 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga was killed on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, when flood waters inundated her car as she was driving home from work. The underpass is not wide enough to accommodate two cars, so motorists must alternate going under it. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)

East Coast braces for more heavy rain, approaching hurricane

With already-saturated soils and flooded roads, East Coast states were bracing for another day of dreary and possibly dangerous weather Friday as forecasters predicted more downpours and a possible added punch from powerful Hurricane Joaquin.

This NOAA satellite image taken Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 12:45 AM EDT shows Tropical Storm Joaquin barreling into the Bahama Islands with maximum sustained winds of seventy miles per hour.   (Weather Underground via AP)

Hurricane Joaquin forms near the Bahamas

The Bahamas was bracing Wednesday for a brush with Hurricane Joaquin, which was on a projected track that would take it near the East Coast of the U.S. early next week.

This Sept. 13, 2015 image provided by NASA shows the moon, left, and the Earth, top, transiting the sun together, seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The edge of Earth appears fuzzy because the atmosphere blocks different amounts of light at different altitudes. This image was taken in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, invisible to human eyes, but here colorized in gold. A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon.  (NASA/SDO via AP)

‘Blood Moon’ seen as sign of end times by some Mormons

It’s unclear how many Latter-day Saints buy the theory, but Mormon leaders were worried enough that they took the rare step this week of issuing a public statement cautioning the faithful not to get carried away with visions of the apocalypse.

This Sept. 13, 2015 image provided by NASA shows the moon, left, and the Earth, top, transiting the sun together, seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The edge of Earth appears fuzzy because the atmosphere blocks different amounts of light at different altitudes. This image was taken in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, invisible to human eyes, but here colorized in gold. A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon Sunday evening, Sept. 27, 2015 as seen from the United States. That combination hasn't been seen since 1982 and won't happen again until 2033. (NASA/SDO via AP)

Supermoon plus eclipse equals rare sky show Sunday night

A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon Sunday night or early Monday, depending where you are. That combination hasn’t been seen since 1982 and won’t happen again until 2033.

A helicopter makes a water drop on a wildfire hot spot Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, in Carmel Valley, Calif. The blaze burning north of the community of Jamesburg quickly grew after starting Saturday afternoon, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. (Vern Fisher/The Monterey County Herald via AP)

Crews gain more control over destructive California blazes

Crews made gains overnight on one of the worst wildfires in California history, mopping up hot spots and strengthening control lines after it and two other blazes in the northern part of the state have combined to kill several people and destroy nearly 1,600 homes.

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Tropical Storm Ida gets stronger in the Atlantic

The storm’s maximum sustained winds Monday morning increased to near 50 mph (80 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says additional strengthening is forecast during the next day or so followed by slight weakening on Wednesday.