Cars head toward the railroad underpass in Spartanburg, S.C., where 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga was killed on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, when flood waters inundated her car as she was driving home from work. The underpass is not wide enough to accommodate two cars, so motorists must alternate going under it. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)

East Coast braces for more heavy rain, approaching hurricane

With already-saturated soils and flooded roads, East Coast states were bracing for another day of dreary and possibly dangerous weather Friday as forecasters predicted more downpours and a possible added punch from powerful Hurricane Joaquin.

This NOAA satellite image taken Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 12:45 AM EDT shows Tropical Storm Joaquin barreling into the Bahama Islands with maximum sustained winds of seventy miles per hour.   (Weather Underground via AP)

Hurricane Joaquin forms near the Bahamas

The Bahamas was bracing Wednesday for a brush with Hurricane Joaquin, which was on a projected track that would take it near the East Coast of the U.S. early next week.

This Sept. 13, 2015 image provided by NASA shows the moon, left, and the Earth, top, transiting the sun together, seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The edge of Earth appears fuzzy because the atmosphere blocks different amounts of light at different altitudes. This image was taken in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, invisible to human eyes, but here colorized in gold. A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon.  (NASA/SDO via AP)

‘Blood Moon’ seen as sign of end times by some Mormons

It’s unclear how many Latter-day Saints buy the theory, but Mormon leaders were worried enough that they took the rare step this week of issuing a public statement cautioning the faithful not to get carried away with visions of the apocalypse.

This Sept. 13, 2015 image provided by NASA shows the moon, left, and the Earth, top, transiting the sun together, seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The edge of Earth appears fuzzy because the atmosphere blocks different amounts of light at different altitudes. This image was taken in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, invisible to human eyes, but here colorized in gold. A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon Sunday evening, Sept. 27, 2015 as seen from the United States. That combination hasn't been seen since 1982 and won't happen again until 2033. (NASA/SDO via AP)

Supermoon plus eclipse equals rare sky show Sunday night

A total lunar eclipse will share the stage with a so-called supermoon Sunday night or early Monday, depending where you are. That combination hasn’t been seen since 1982 and won’t happen again until 2033.

A helicopter makes a water drop on a wildfire hot spot Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, in Carmel Valley, Calif. The blaze burning north of the community of Jamesburg quickly grew after starting Saturday afternoon, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. (Vern Fisher/The Monterey County Herald via AP)

Crews gain more control over destructive California blazes

Crews made gains overnight on one of the worst wildfires in California history, mopping up hot spots and strengthening control lines after it and two other blazes in the northern part of the state have combined to kill several people and destroy nearly 1,600 homes.

Tropical Storm Ida gets stronger in the Atlantic

The storm’s maximum sustained winds Monday morning increased to near 50 mph (80 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says additional strengthening is forecast during the next day or so followed by slight weakening on Wednesday.

This photo released by National Park Service shows from left to right: Gary Favela, Don Teichner, Muku Reynolds, Steve Arthur, Linda Arthur, Robin Brum, and Mark MacKenzie.  The hikers, six from California and one from Nevada, died when fast-moving floodwaters rushed through a narrow park canyon Monday, Sept. 14, 2015.  (National Park Service via AP)

Photo found after flooding reveals final image of 7 hikers

The men and women from California and Nevada posed with their arms around each other before trying to climb and swim through the popular sandstone gorge. Days later, rescuers searching for their bodies found the camera, revealing the final image of the group before they died.

FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2015, file photo, the Canyon Creek Complex fire burns near John Day, Ore. In addition to rangeland lost, ranchers and ranching groups say hundreds of cows have perished and millions of dollars’ worth of hay stacks and barns has gone up in flames. (Les Zaitz/The Oregonian/OregonLive via AP, File)   MAGS OUT; TV OUT; NO LOCAL INTERNET; THE MERCURY OUT; WILLAMETTE WEEK OUT; PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

As wildfires rage in West, ranchers lose cattle, rangeland

The vast majority of the 1.6 million acres — nearly 2,600 square miles — that burned in Oregon, Idaho and Washington this year are federally owned, data show, with large swaths of that public land used as rangeland for livestock grazing.