In this photo taken on Oct. 16, 2014 photo, Jim Albaugh talks about his living arrangements in the New York apartment he shares with two roommates. Albaugh could be thought of as just one of the working poor, untold millions in the baby boomer generation who are not prepared for retirement. But he represents something more as one of thousands of gay and lesbian baby boomers confronting a retirement of greater financial hardship than his straight peers. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Financial tips for same-sex couples

Even though 35 of the 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. allow same-sex marriage, LGBT couples still face significant legal hurtles in many areas that could impact their financial well-being.

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Supreme Court rejects blood transfusion case

The Supreme Court won’t hear an appeal from the estate of a Michigan woman who died following a kidney transplant after turning down a blood transfusion because of her religious beliefs.

Members of the St. Louis Rams raise their arms in awareness of the events in Ferguson, Mo.,  as they walk onto the field during introductions before an NFL football game against the Oakland Raiders, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014, in St. Louis.  The players said after the game, they raised their arms in a "hands up" gesture to acknowledge the events in Ferguson. (AP Photo/L.G. Patterson)

A glance at developments in Ferguson

President Barack Obama planned to hold meetings Monday on the Ferguson situation, and a few members of the St. Louis Rams football team showed their support for protesters who have been rallying in the streets and at retail stores.

This Nov. 14, 2014, photo, shows Peggy Young, of Lorton, Va., with her daughter Triniti, 7, in Washington. Peggy Young has only to look at her 7-year-old younger daughter to be reminded how long she has been fighting with United Parcel Service over its treatment of pregnant employees, and why. Young was pregnant when the company told her she could not have a temporary assignment to avoid lifting heavy packages, as her doctor ordered. She sued UPS for discriminating against pregnant women and, after losing two rounds in lower courts, the Supreme Court will hear her case Wednesday.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Pregnancy bias claim at US high court

UPS spokeswoman Kara Gerhardt Ross said the law is on the company’s side. “UPS did not intentionally discriminate,” Ross said.