Customers dine at the gourmet emporium Eataly in New York Monday, Nov. 16, 2015.   From cafes in Manhattan to a throng of football tailgaters in the heartland, Americans asked a gnawing question in the aftermath of the carnage in Paris: Can anything be done in the United States to prevent a similar “soft-target” attack, in which well-organized extremists strike at the restaurants, bars and gathering spots that stand out for being ordinary? (AP Photo/Verena Dobnik)

Paris attacks lead Americans to wonder about US safety

From cafes to sports stadiums in the heartland, the bloodbath in Paris has Americans pondering the possibility of terrorist attacks on “soft targets” in the U.S. such as restaurants, bars and other ordinary gathering spots.

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Some governors halt, question plan to accept Syrian refugees

Several U.S. governors, including Indiana’s Mike Pence, are threatening to halt efforts to allow Syrian refugees into their states in the aftermath of the coordinated attacks in Paris, though an immigration expert says they have no legal authority to do so.

FILE - In this May 17, 2012, file photo, the steel skeleton for the eastern end of the new Innerbelt Bridge in Cleveland sits next to the existing span. As Congress races to renew the law that pays for national transportation programs, lobbyists are in a frenzy to shape dozens of provisions, from the length of trucks allowed on roads to whether recalled used cars must be repaired before sold and how to pay for bridges and highways. The bill is the lobbyists’ best shot in years to achieve favorable transportation policies or block regulations they don’t like. Congress hopes to reconcile differences between the House and Senate versions of the bill, and get a compromise to President Barack Obama for his signature before the government’s authority to process highway and transit aid payments to states expires. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)

Transportation bill is target of lobbying frenzy

Congress is racing toward a Friday deadline to renew the law that pays for national transportation programs, and lobbyists trying to shape the legislation are in a frenzy.