GOP 2016 Carson

Carson questions claims of racial bias against police

The retired neurosurgeon told moderator Jeffrey Johnson of the Black Entertainment Television network, “I’m not aware of a lot of cases where a police officer just comes up to somebody like you and says, ‘Hey, I don’t like you. I’m going to shoot you.”

From left, House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., Rep. Dan Newhouse R-Wash., Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, and Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., confer on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, following a meeting of the conservative Republican Study Committee ahead of legislation aimed at increasing screenings for Syrian and Iraqi refugees before they enter the U.S., including a requirement for FBI background checks.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

House votes to curb Syrian refugees, snubs Obama veto threat

The attacks in Paris have turned the question of admitting people fleeing war-torn Syria and Iraq into a political issue in both the United States and Europe, and many congressional Democrats were willing to vote against their party’s lame duck president.

Customers dine at the gourmet emporium Eataly in New York Monday, Nov. 16, 2015.   From cafes in Manhattan to a throng of football tailgaters in the heartland, Americans asked a gnawing question in the aftermath of the carnage in Paris: Can anything be done in the United States to prevent a similar “soft-target” attack, in which well-organized extremists strike at the restaurants, bars and gathering spots that stand out for being ordinary? (AP Photo/Verena Dobnik)

Paris attacks lead Americans to wonder about US safety

From cafes to sports stadiums in the heartland, the bloodbath in Paris has Americans pondering the possibility of terrorist attacks on “soft targets” in the U.S. such as restaurants, bars and other ordinary gathering spots.