FILE - This Feb. 14, 2013, file photo shows a Honda logo on the trunk of a Honda automobile at the Pittsburgh Auto Show, in Pittsburgh. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Thursday, June 30, 2016, it is urging owners of 313,000 older Hondas and Acuras to stop driving them and get them repaired after new tests found that their Takata air bag inflators are extremely dangerous. The agency's urgent advisory covers 2001 and 2002 Honda Civics and Accords, the 2002 and 2003 Acura TL, the 2002 Honda Odyssey and CR-V, and the 2003 Acura CL and Honda Pilot, NHTSA said. "These vehicles are unsafe and need to be repaired immediately," Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement. "Folks should not drive these vehicles unless they are going straight to a dealer to have them repaired." (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Government urges owners of old Hondas to get air bags fixed

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Thursday that it has data showing that chances are as high as 50 percent that the inflators can explode in a crash, injuring people by sending metal shrapnel into the passenger compartments.

The United States Air Force Thunderbirds fly overhead before the Daytona 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race at Daytona International Speedway, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, in Daytona Beach, Fla.(AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

‘All clear’ given at military base near DC

A tweet sent Thursday morning instructs all personnel at the base in Washington’s Maryland suburbs to shelter in place and says more information will be released as it comes.

With two Ikea dressers displayed at right, Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Chairman Elliot Kaye speaks during a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Ikea is recalling 29 million chests and dressers after six children were killed when the furniture toppled over and fell on them. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Ikea recalls 29 million dressers after 6 kids killed

The Swedish retailer announced the recall Tuesday, saying the furniture can pose “a tip-over and entrapment hazard that can result in death or injuries to children” if it is not properly anchored to a wall.