This undated photo made available by the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, shows the Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope. The World Health Organization on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014 declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to be an international public health emergency that requires an extraordinary response to stop its spread. (AP Photo/Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine)

A look at US response to Ebola crisis

A look at some of the initiatives President Barack Obama is announcing to ramp up the U.S. response to West Africa’s Ebola crisis:

File Photo (MGN)

More children live to age 5, work still to be done

More of the world’s children are surviving to their fifth birthday, but 6.3 million still died last year, mostly from preventable causes, the U.N. children’s agency said Tuesday.

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2014 file photo, Valor Christian High School sophomore and volunteer Paige Kula loads a pallet with medical supplies bound for Sierra Leone to combat Ebola, inside the warehouse of Project C.U.R.E., in Centennial, Colo. The US strategy in fighting Ebola is two-pronged: Step up efforts to deliver desperately needed supplies and people to West Africa, while making sure hospitals at home know what to do if someone travels here with the infection. In addition to shipments of hospital beds and protective suits, the government is taking unusual steps to encourage a variety of health care workers to volunteer to go to the outbreak zone _ and is offering some training before they head out. Here are questions and answers on the U.S. response. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

US works to step up Ebola aid, but is it enough?

The American strategy on Ebola is two-pronged: Step up desperately needed aid to West Africa and, in an unusual step, train U.S. doctors and nurses for volunteer duty in the outbreak zone.