A member of the U.S army walks past a newly constructed Ebola treatment centre in Bongcounty, on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Oct. 7, 2014. Liberia has been among the hardest hit nations at the center of the long outbreak, which has killed more than 3,000 people. As of Friday, there had been 3,834 confirmed Ebola cases and 2,069 deaths in Liberia, according to the World Health Organization. Forty-four percent of those cases were reported in the past three weeks, a signal that the infectious disease is spreading. (AP Photo/Abbas Duller)

Report: Cost of Ebola could top $32 billion

The World Bank’s assessment said the economic impact of Ebola is already serious in the three countries and could be catastrophic if it becomes a more regional health crisis.

FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 6, 2009 photo, the owner of a coffee shop serves cappuccinos to judges during a barista competition in Cranberry, Pa. Scientists have long known that one's genes influence how much of coffee one consumes, and a study released Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 by the journal Molecular Psychiatry has identified some genes that may play a role. Their apparent effect is quite small. But variations in these genes may modify coffee’s effect on a person’s health, and so such genetic research may help scientists explore that, said Marilyn Cornelis of the Harvard School of Public Health. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

DNA linked to how much coffee you drink

Scientists have long known that your DNA influences how much java you consume. Now a huge study has identified some genes that may play a role.

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. Hospitals around the country are already getting ample opportunities to test their infection control procedures due to a growing number of Ebola Virus infection false alarms. (AP Photo/CDC, File)

US health providers expand their Ebola precautions

Public hospitals in New York City are concerned enough about Ebola that they’ve secretly been sending actors with mock symptoms into emergency rooms to test how well the triage staffs identify and isolate possible cases.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden speaks at a news conference Sunday Oct. 5, 2014 at the CDC in Atlanta. Frieden said that he was aware that Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan's health had "taken a turn for the worse," but he declined to say what signs of poor health Duncan had shown. (AP Photo/Johnny Clark)

More Ebola screening possible for United States

Ahead of a White House meeting on the Ebola outbreak, federal health officials said Monday the U.S. is weighing whether to institute extra screening at U.S. airports where travelers from Ebola-stricken African nations may be arriving.