FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 6, 2009 photo, the owner of a coffee shop serves cappuccinos to judges during a barista competition in Cranberry, Pa. Scientists have long known that one's genes influence how much of coffee one consumes, and a study released Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 by the journal Molecular Psychiatry has identified some genes that may play a role. Their apparent effect is quite small. But variations in these genes may modify coffee’s effect on a person’s health, and so such genetic research may help scientists explore that, said Marilyn Cornelis of the Harvard School of Public Health. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

DNA linked to how much coffee you drink

Scientists have long known that your DNA influences how much java you consume. Now a huge study has identified some genes that may play a role.

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. Hospitals around the country are already getting ample opportunities to test their infection control procedures due to a growing number of Ebola Virus infection false alarms. (AP Photo/CDC, File)

US health providers expand their Ebola precautions

Public hospitals in New York City are concerned enough about Ebola that they’ve secretly been sending actors with mock symptoms into emergency rooms to test how well the triage staffs identify and isolate possible cases.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden speaks at a news conference Sunday Oct. 5, 2014 at the CDC in Atlanta. Frieden said that he was aware that Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan's health had "taken a turn for the worse," but he declined to say what signs of poor health Duncan had shown. (AP Photo/Johnny Clark)

More Ebola screening possible for United States

Ahead of a White House meeting on the Ebola outbreak, federal health officials said Monday the U.S. is weighing whether to institute extra screening at U.S. airports where travelers from Ebola-stricken African nations may be arriving.

Hazardous material cleaners disinfectant their personal protective equipment after working in the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas, stayed last week, Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014, in Dallas. A homeless man being sought because of possible contact with the lone U.S. Ebola patient was found in Texas after several hours of searching, authorities said. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Journalist with Ebola arrives at Nebraska hospital

Ashoka Mukpo, 33, arrived by ambulance Monday at the Nebraska Medical Center, where he will be kept in a specialized biocontainment unit built specifically to handle this type of illness.

FILE This is  a 2008 file photo of  Norwegian scientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser pictured when they received the Fernstrom award in 2008. The Nobel Assembly at the  Karolinska Institute in Stockholm on Monday Oct. 6, 2014  announced that the Nobel l Prize for Medicine 2014 was awarded  to U.S.-British John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser  "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain".   (AP Photo / Drago Prvulovic / TT, File)   SWEDEN OUT

3 win medicine Nobel for discovering brain’s GPS

A U.S.-British scientist and a Norwegian husband-and-wife research team won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering the brain’s navigation system — the inner GPS that helps us find our way in the world.