President Barack Obama walks from Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014, upon his return from a meeting at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. The president met with military chiefs in a show of strength against Islamic State fighters in Iraq and Syria. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama cancels campaign trip to focus on Ebola

Obama’s decision to nix the trip — just a few hours before Air Force One was scheduled to depart — reflected the urgency facing the administration amid the American public’s escalating concerns about potential spread of the virus.

A police line tape marks where the media is set up to watch The Village Bend East apartments where a second healthcare worker lives that tested positive for Ebola, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, in Dallas. Fears of the Ebola virus deepened with word that the healthcare worker, a nurse, caught the disease from a patient in Dallas, and flew across the Midwest aboard an airliner the day before she was diagnosed. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

2nd Ebola victim flew to Ohio before becoming ill

The Dallas nurse had flown on a commercial airliner from Texas to Ohio and back before she came down with symptoms.

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. The U.S. government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports, including the New York area's JFK International and Newark Liberty International, as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Dallas nurses cite sloppy conditions in Ebola care

Nurses were forced to use medical tape to secure openings in their flimsy garments, worried that their necks and heads were exposed as they cared for a patient with explosive diarrhea and projectile vomiting.

File photo

New test to bump up diagnoses of illness in kids

The test is a yes/no check for enterovirus 68, which since August has been fingered as the cause of hundreds of asthma-like respiratory illnesses in children — some so severe the patients needed a breathing machine.

This Aug. 14, 2014 photo shows child-proof refill bottles of liquid nicotine at Salt Lake Vapors, in Salt Lake City. Poison control workers say that as the e-cigarette industry has boomed, the number of children exposed to the liquid nicotine that gives hand-held vaporizing gadgets their kick also is spiking. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Liquid nicotine exposures up sharply among kids

Poison control workers say that as the e-cigarette industry has boomed, the number of children exposed to the liquid nicotine that gives hand-held vaporizing gadgets their kick also has spiked.

FILE - A sign points to the entrance to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where U.S. Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan was being treated, in this Oct. 8, 2014 file photo, in Dallas. Health officials said Sunday Oct. 12, 2014 a health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who provided care for Eric Duncan has tested positive for Ebola in a preliminary test "confirmatory testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta." (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Can all US hospitals safely treat Ebola?

Another federal official has suggested it was worth rethinking whether to send patients to one of the specialized units set up to deal with dangerous germs.

Seen through the window of his Oval Office, President Barack Obama talks with Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell for an update on the new Ebola virus diagnosis in Dallas at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama gets update on latest Ebola developments

Obama also is having federal authorities take more steps to make sure hospitals and health care providers are ready to follow the proper procedures in dealing with an Ebola patient.