FILE - In this Thursday Jan. 2, 2014, file photo, Mother Patricia Mary walks in the hallway at the Mullen Home for the Aged, run by Little Sisters of the Poor, in Denver. Faith-based nonprofit organizations that object to covering birth control in their employee health plans are in federal court Monday, Dec. 8, 2014, to challenge a birth-control compromise they say still compels them to violate their religious beliefs. The plaintiffs include the group of Denver nuns known as the Little Sisters of the Poor, who run more than two dozen nursing homes for impoverished seniors. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

Religious nonprofits challenge health law

The groups are appealing to the 10th Circuit in Denver, the court that ruled last year that for-profit companies can join the exempted religious organizations and not provide the contraceptives.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Obama administration officials are acknowledging that HealthCare.gov premiums, on average, will go up next year. But the same officials say most current customers can still save money if they are willing to shop around a competitive marketplace. In a report released Thursday, the Health and Human Services Department says premiums for the most popular type of plan will go up an average of 5 percent in 35 states where the federal government is running the health insurance exchanges. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Average Affordable Care premiums going up in 2015

Officials stressed that millions of current HealthCare.gov customers can mitigate the financial hit if they’re willing to shop around for another plan in a more competitive online marketplace.

In this Sept. 1, 2011 file photo, Dr. Nancy Snyderman talks about child vaccination on the "Today" show in New York. NBC News medical reporter Snyderman spoke with Matt Lauer on the “Today” show, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014, and apologized for violating her quarantine for Ebola exposure, saying she failed to appreciate how frightened Americans were of the disease. (AP Photo/NBC, Peter Kramer, File)

NBC’s Snyderman returns with apology

NBC had kept her off the air following an angry reaction to her leaving her house when she had been asked to quarantine herself after she covered Ebola in Africa.