This photo provided by Gilead Sciences, Inc. shows the drug Epclusa. Federal health officials on Tuesday, June 28, 2016, approved the first pill to treat all major forms of hepatitis C, the latest in a series of drug approvals that have reshaped treatment of the liver-destroying virus. (Gilead Sciences, Inc. via AP)

FDA approves first pill to treat all forms of hepatitis C

The drug won’t be cheap. Epclusa will cost $74,760 for a 12-week course of treatment, or roughly $890 per pill. That’s less than the initial price for company’s previous drug, Harvoni, which cost $1,125 per pill.

(AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Not doing it: Fewer high school kids are having sex

The troubles with kids these days … are not as common as they used to be. U.S. teens are having a lot less sex, they are drinking and using drugs less often, and they aren’t smoking as much, according a government survey.

File photo

For the first time, more than 4 in 10 US women are obese

Obesity rates for men and women in the U.S. had been roughly the same for about a decade. But in recent years, women have surged ahead and now just over 40 percent of women are obese, compared to 35 percent of men.

In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, Dr. Ronald C. Chen consults with colleague Misty Lehman-Davis on a cancer patient's scans at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill, N.C.  (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

Summary

When to give up: Treatment or comfort for late-stage cancer?

When to stop aggressive treatment is one of the most wrenching decisions in cancer care. Medical guidelines say dying cancer patients shouldn’t get harsh and painful treatment, but new research suggests it happens almost all of the time.

Naloxone

Heroin, painkiller overdose antidote getting easier to buy

Naloxone, which is known by the brand-name Narcan, can quickly revive someone who has stopped breathing after overdosing on so-called opioids, highly addictive drugs that include prescription painkillers like Vicodin as well as illegal narcotics like heroin.