Trump declares opioids a public health emergency

President Donald Trump on Thursday declared the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency — a step that won’t bring new dollars to fight a scourge that kills nearly 100 Americans a day but will expand access to medical services in rural areas, among other changes.

Dollars targeting opioids hit hurdles as impatience builds

In some locations, people addicted to opioids are starting to get treatment for the first time. In others, bureaucratic hurdles prevent innovation, driving home the point that gaining ground on the epidemic will be difficult.

Pharmacist in deadly meningitis outbreak cleared of murder

Jurors said prosecutors failed to prove Glenn Chin was responsible for the deaths of people who were injected with mold-contaminated drugs produced by the now-closed New England Compounding Center in Framingham, just west of Boston. As the supervisory pharmacist, Chin oversaw the so-called clean rooms where the drugs were made.

Walgreens and WANE partner for Flu Day

Health experts say the best way to avoid getting the flu is to get a flu shot. So mark your calendar for October 25 to get that shot at area Walgreens pharmacies.

US obesity problem is not budging, new data shows

The new figures are from an annual government survey with about 5,000 participants. The survey is considered the gold standard for measuring the nation’s waistline, because participants are put on a scale to verify their weight.

Trump to halt subsidies to health insurers

The White House said in a statement that the government cannot legally continue to pay the so-called cost sharing subsidies because they lack a formal authorization by Congress.

White House to order health care alternatives

President Donald Trump has long asserted that selling insurance across state lines would trigger competition that brings down premiums for people buying their own policies. Experts say that’s not guaranteed, partly because health insurance reflects local medical costs, which vary widely around the country.

The big question: Will cancer immune therapy work for me?

Cancer was ravaging his liver, lungs, bones and brain, and tests showed so many tumor mutations that drugs targeting one or two wouldn’t do much good. It seemed like very bad news, yet his doctors were encouraged.
The reason: People with the most messed-up genes often are the ones who do best on treatments that enlist the immune system.

Tattoo and piercing advice for teens

Tattoos and piercings have become a common trend for young adults. Now for the first time – the American Academy of Pediatrics is weighing in, offering its recommendations for teenagers.