Gailen Lopton, seated second from right, talks with Seattle police Officer Tom Christenson, top, as he hangs out in downtown Seattle, Tuesday, April 7, 2015. When Lopton was caught injecting heroin by police in a downtown alley in March, the officers offered him a chance to enroll in a first-of-its-kind program called Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, aimed at keeping low-level drug offenders and prostitutes out of jail and receiving services for housing, counseling and job training. A study released Wednesday, April 8, 2015 by the University of Washington found encouraging signs of the program's effectiveness, and other cities are hoping to start programs of their own. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Seattle attempt to keep addicts out of jail shines in study

The results in Seattle are so encouraging that advocates say it should prompt reconsideration of President Barack Obama’s call for an expansion of drug court programs and a hard look at replicating Seattle’s effort nationwide, as some cities are doing.

Murder defendant Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, left, listens to his co-defense counsel Terry Alford, center, during a Monday, April 6, 2015 death penalty hearing for Hicks in Durham Criminal Superior Court in Durham, N.C. Presiding Judge Orlando Hudson found that Hicks, charged with first-degree murder in the killing of three Muslim college students, can face a death penalty trial.  (AP Photo/The News & Observer, Harry Lynch)

NC prosecutor details the shootings of 3 Muslims students

When he was arrested, prosecutors say the man charged with killing three North Carolina college students had possession of the murder weapon, gunshot residue on his hands and blood from one of the victims splattered on his pants.