Total eclipse 2017

Photo: NASA

It’s not a “Total Eclipse of the Heart,” but an actual total eclipse that the contiguous U.S. will see on August 21, 2017. It’s the first such eclipse since 1979. So what exactly happens during a total eclipse?

Photo: NASA

During an eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and the earth, blocking out the sunlight. During a total eclipse, the moon lines up perfectly with the sun to fully obscure the sunlight. For much more information about the eclipse, you can visit NASA’s Eclipse page or check out http://www.nationaleclipse.com/

As for what we can expect to see here in northeast Indiana and northwest Ohio, Fort Wayne should see 85.9% of the sun covered at exactly 2:25:21 PM EDT. The total eclipse itself should last less than 2 minutes, but you’ll see the moon move over the sun before and after that time. But, you can’t just go outside and look at the sun!

Photo: NASA

If you want to really get the most out of this event, head down to Hopkinsville, KY – it’s the point of greatest eclipse during this event! The sun will be completely obscured by the moon for 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

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