IS women suicide bombers hit Iraqi troops in Mosul, kill 1

In this Monday, Sept. 1, 2014 photo, Shiite militiamen hold the flag of the Islamic State group they captured, during an operation outside Amirli, some 105 miles (170 kilometers) north of Baghdad, Iraq. Under the shadow of the Islamic State group threat, governments from France to Indonesia are moving aggressively to block would-be jihadis from taking their fight to Syria and Iraq. New laws make it easier to seize passports. Suspected fighters are being plucked from planes. Authorities are blocking finances and shutting down radical mosques. Behind the scenes, Western intelligence agencies are striving to stay ahead of tech-savvy radicalized Muslims by pressuring Silicon Valley firms to wipe extremist content from websites and toying with new technologies to identify returning fighters at the border. Britain has taken a particularly active role in censoring content deemed to break the country’s strict rules against extremist propaganda. U.K. officials recently revealed it had been granted “super flagger” status on sites such as YouTube, meaning their requests to remove videos with grisly content or that encourage terrorism are fast-tracked. (AP Photo)

 

MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — An Iraqi officer says that two women suicide bombers, hiding among a group of fleeing civilians, targeted Iraqi troops in Mosul, killing one soldier and wounding several.

Sgt. Ali Abdullah Hussein says the attack was the latest by the Islamic State group as Iraqi forces close in on the last pocket of militant-held territory in the Old City neighborhood. The IS group’s last stand in Mosul is rapidly shrinking, with the militants now controlling just over 1 square kilometer in all.

Hussein says the attack happened on Monday morning in the area of the destroyed al-Nuri Mosque.

He said that over the past three days, at least four such attacks have targeted Iraqi forces as hundreds of civilians flee the fierce fighting in the Old City’s congested streets.

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