THC-laced lollipops found at Noble County school

NOBLE COUNTY, Ind. (WANE) Several students at West Noble High School were reportedly caught with lollipops laced with highly concentrated THC at the school.

Police in Noble County found marijuana-laced lollipops at West Noble High School on Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016. (Noble County Sheriff's Department)
Police in Noble County found marijuana-laced lollipops at West Noble High School on Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016. (Noble County Sheriff’s Department)

According to a post on the Noble County Sheriff’s Department’s Facebook page, officials at West Noble High School busted a “transaction” that involved suspicious lollipops at the school last week. The administrators called in West Noble School Resource Officer and Noble County Sheriff Deputy Brandon Chordas, who found the cherry flavored lollipops were laced with marijuana, the post said.

Investigators believe the THC levels in the lollipops were of a higher concentration than normal marijuana and had the potential for a stronger high, the post said. The lollipops were being tested at the Indiana State Police Laboratory.

The sheriff’s department said in the post that the students involved in the deal “face discipline,” but it did not indicate whether they were arrested and charged or if the school would administer punishments. Chad Willett with the sheriff’s department told NewsChannel 15 that charges would likely be forwarded to Noble County’s juvenile probation department.

The students were not identified.

Willett said the lollipops were wrapped in plastics, with a pharmaceutical warning on them. The students purchased the lollipops locally from another student, but investigators aren’t sure whether they were initially bought from a medical marijuana dispensary in a neighboring state or over the Internet, Willett said.

With medical marijuana legal in both Michigan and Ohio now, Willett said the drug is likely to trickle into Indiana more and more.

“I’m thinking this edible stuff that’s out there is probably going to be more prevalent now that we’re basically surrounded in northeast Indiana with some form of legalized marijuana,” said Willett. “If you ask me, if you look at those pictures, I really could never the difference.”

The department in the post urged parents to “be aware of these cannabis candies” because they appear similar to a normal lollipop. Willett said later that children especially could have a potentially dangerous reaction.

“It’s scary to think that a child who didn’t know what it was, was to get a hold of something like that, the reaction that they could have,” said Willett. “As a parent, it could be somewhat disturbing because I would never have known the difference if it was two of them sitting out there together.”