Cupping? Not just for Olympic athletes

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) While the healing art of “cupping” has been around for a long time – it’s just now getting a lot of attention.

Dr. Lauren Warner at Living Well Center in Fort Wayne performs a "cupping" session on a patient on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016.
Dr. Lauren Warner at Living Well Center in Fort Wayne performs a “cupping” session on a patient on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016.

That’s because many of the Olympic Athletes have the markings on their bodies, including swimmer Michael Phelps.

Living Well Center in Fort Wayne performs “cupping”. Dr. Lauren Warner told NewsChannel 15 on Wednesday that “cupping” has been around for thousands of years.

She said, think of it as a reverse massage.

Instead of pushing down on the tissue, it’s bringing up the tissue – getting rid of the lactic acid.

“Cupping” helps reduce fatigue and soreness and helps with flexibility – which is why you see many of the Olympic Athletes doing this.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, photo, "cupping" marks are seen on the shoulders of United States' Michael Phelps as he celebrates winning the gold medal in the men's 200-meter butterfly during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
FILE – In this Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, photo, “cupping” marks are seen on the shoulders of United States’ Michael Phelps as he celebrates winning the gold medal in the men’s 200-meter butterfly during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

“The reason the athletes are doing it are purely from a physiological stand point,” said Dr. Warner. “They’re finding trigger points, they’re putting a suction cup on it and what it does is it creates kind of a lifting from the skin to the muscle and when you lift up on that you actually, the purple marks are because you’re breaking up the capillaries and when you do that you get fresh rush of blood to the area and it’s really good for clearing out lactic acid.”

Warner said she expects more athletes, especially track and field athletes, will use the “cupping” technique.

Comments are closed.