Presidential candidates make final push for Hoosier votes

WASHINGTON (AP)  – Donald Trump told supporters at his final rally ahead of Indiana’s primary that if he wins the contest Tuesday, the Republican nomination in his.

“If we win in Indiana, it’s over with, folks,” Trump is telling thousands of cheering supporters at a rally in South Bend.

Donald Trump speaking to a crowd of about 7,000 in Fort Wayne on May 1, 2016.
Donald Trump speaking to a crowd of about 7,000 in Fort Wayne on May 1, 2016.

Trump has been making the case over the last few days that a win in the state should signal an end to rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich. Both men are trying to stop Trump from winning a majority of delegates, which would force a contested convention.

But Trump says he’s eager to move forward to a one-on-one match with Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton.

“That’s going to be fun,” he says.

Trump was introduced in South Bend on Monday evening by former Purdue basketball coach Gene Keady and former Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps.

He also announced the backing Monday of former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz.

“We’ve had so many great endorsements,” says Trump, who has also been endorsed by former Indiana Hoosiers basketball coach Bob Knight.

Phelps says Trump “is the man who will make America great again.”

Ted Cruz sparred with Donald Trump supporters on the eve of the Indiana primary.

Ted Cruz speaks to a crowd at the Grand Wayne Center in Fort Wayne on Thursday, April 28, 2016.
Ted Cruz speaks to a crowd at the Grand Wayne Center in Fort Wayne on Thursday, April 28, 2016.

Protesters carrying Trump signs confronted the Texas senator as he campaigned in Marion, Indiana on Monday.

One man yelled, “Lyin’ Ted!” while standing just a few feet from the Republican presidential candidate. The insult is Trump’s pet name for his chief rival.

Cruz responded with a question. He asked the protester, “What do you like about him? … Name one thing.” The Trump supporter had a simple response: “Everything.”

The exchange came during one of Cruz’s five scheduled stops on Monday. He was campaigning alongside Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

Meanwhile, Ted Cruz’s campaign says his choice for running mate, Carly Fiorina, is uninjured after falling on the campaign stage.

Carly Fiorina speaks at the Grand Wayne Center in Fort Wayne.
Carly Fiorina speaks at the Grand Wayne Center in Fort Wayne.

Cruz spokeswoman Catherine Frazier says Fiorina missed a step Sunday but was uninjured and continues to campaign on behalf of the senator in Indiana.

The stumble comes as Cruz is trying to shake off the perception that his campaign is in trouble heading into the Indiana primary on Tuesday.

Cruz has vowed to keep up his campaign as long as he has a viable route to winning the GOP nomination.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said Indiana’s primary will be important to his goal of amassing as many delegates as possible to catch up with rival Hillary Clinton.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke at IPFW in Fort Wayne on Monday, May 2, 2016, ahead of the Indiana primary election May 3.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke at IPFW in Fort Wayne on Monday.

And he’s acknowledged that’s a big challenge. In Evansville, Indiana, Sanders is telling supporters that with 10 states left, his campaign needs to earn more than 50 percent of the remaining delegates up for grabs. The Vermont senator said he will “fight as hard as we can for every vote.”

 

Sanders said he has won 45 percent of the pledged delegates awarded so far but only about 7 percent of the superdelegates — the party leaders who can vote for either Democratic candidate but are overwhelmingly committed to Clinton.

Sanders said his campaign has been winning among voters 45 years of age and younger, showing that his ideas are “the ideas for the future of this country.”

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton toured Munster Steel in Hammond on Tuesday, April 26, 2016, and then talk to workers.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton toured Munster Steel in Hammond on Tuesday, April 26, 2016, and then talk to workers.

Hillary Clinton’s campaign says she raised about $26 million in April for her primary race against Bernie Sanders, as her rival’s fundraising juggernaut slowed.

Sanders’ take for April was a little under Clinton’s, marking a steep decline from the $46 million he raised in March. He did not report how much money he has on hand, raising questions about whether he can sustain his long-robust online fundraising as his path to the nomination narrows.

Clinton’s campaign says she has $30 million in the bank heading into May. She had about $29 million at the start of last month.

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