House passes bipartisan budget plan, debt limit increase

Outgoing House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, center, flanked by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., talks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. House Republican leaders on Tuesday pushed toward a vote on a two-year budget deal despite conservative opposition, relying on the backing of Democrats for the far-reaching pact struck with President Barack Obama. In his last days as speaker, John Boehner was intent on getting the measure through Congress and head off a market-rattling debt crisis next week and a debilitating government shutdown in December. The deal also would take budget showdowns off the table until after the 2016 presidential and congressional elections, a potential boon to the eventual GOP nominee and incumbents facing tough re-election fights. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has passed a bipartisan budget-and-debt deal that prevents an unprecedented government default.

A coalition of Democrats, GOP defense hawks and pragmatic Republicans supported the measure.

The legislation now heads to the Senate, which is on track to pass it before Tuesday’s deadline for increasing the so-called debt limit. It gives the government authority to borrow freely through March 2017.

The measure is the result of hard-fought negotiations between congressional leaders and President Barack Obama.

The bill also calls for approximately $112 billion in additional spending over two years, to be allocated in upcoming legislation negotiated by the House and Senate.

About $80 billion would be offset by spending cuts elsewhere in the budget.

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