Spacecraft diving deep into Saturn moon’s erupting water jet

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Cassini spacecraft is about to get an icy shower as it orbits Saturn.

This July 27, 2015 photo made by the Cassini spacecraft shows the moon Enceladus orbiting the planet Saturn.  (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via AP)
This July 27, 2015 photo made by the Cassini spacecraft shows the moon Enceladus orbiting the planet Saturn. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via AP)

On Wednesday, Cassini will storm through a jet of water vapor and frozen particles erupting from the south pole of Enceladus, one of Saturn’s many moons. The spacecraft will zoom within 30 miles of the moon’s south pole, providing the best sampling yet of its underground ocean.

Cassini will be traveling 19,000 mph, so it should take an instant to penetrate the plume.

A global liquid ocean is believed to exist beneath the frozen crust of 300-mile-wide Enceladus. Wednesday’s dive will be the deepest one yet through one of its plumes.

Launched in 1997, Cassini isn’t equipped to detect life. But scientists hope Wednesday’s flyby will shed light on the potential habitability of Enceladus’ ocean.

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