Ga. debates Confederate carving set in stone and state law

Visitors pass a Confederate flag as it flies at the base of Stone Mountain Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Stone Mountain, Ga. At Georgia's iconic Stone Mountain — where the Confederacy is enshrined in a giant bas-relief sculpture, the Ku Klux Klan once held notorious cross-burnings and large Confederate flags still wave prominently — officials are considering what to do about those flags. The park, which now offers family-friendly fireworks and laser light shows, is readying its "Fantastic Fourth Celebration" Thursday through Sunday, and multiple Confederate flag varieties are still displayed at the mountain's base. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Visitors pass a Confederate flag as it flies at the base of Stone Mountain Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Stone Mountain, Ga. At Georgia's iconic Stone Mountain — where the Confederacy is enshrined in a giant bas-relief sculpture, the Ku Klux Klan once held notorious cross-burnings and large Confederate flags still wave prominently — officials are considering what to do about those flags. The park, which now offers family-friendly fireworks and laser light shows, is readying its "Fantastic Fourth Celebration" Thursday through Sunday, and multiple Confederate flag varieties are still displayed at the mountain's base. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

ATLANTA (AP) — Art, monument or embarrassment?

The “Confederate Memorial Carving” in a state park outside of Atlanta is once again stirring controversy, as Georgia officials try to decide what, if anything, to do about a huge sculpture that memorializes three of the South’s Civil War heroes but causes offense to blacks and others.

Chiseled into a side of Stone Mountain, the carving of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, General Robert E. Lee and General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson spans three acres and is the largest high relief sculpture in the world — even larger than Mount Rushmore.

Controversial since its 1970 unveiling, the sculpture has drawn renewed scrutiny since the massacre of nine black worshippers at a church in South Carolina last month.

By state law, the General Assembly must OK any changes.

 

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