Obama drawing attention to Ebola vaccine research

FILE - This handout file photo taken Sept. 2, 2014, provided by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a 39-year-old woman, the first participant enrolled in VRC 207, receiving a dose of the investigational NIAID/GSK Ebola vaccine at the National Institute of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. The vaccine is designed to spur the immune system’s production of anti-Ebola antibodies, and people developed them within four weeks of getting the shots at the National Institutes of Health. Half of the test group received a higher-dose shot, and those people produced more antibodies, said the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. (AP Photo/NIAID, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is highlighting advances in research for an Ebola vaccine and pushing Congress to approve his request for $6.2 billion to confront the disease abroad and to secure against its spread in the United States.

Obama was to visit the National Institutes of Health in Washington’s Maryland suburbs Tuesday. He planned to congratulate NIH director Francis Collins and the director of NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci (FOW’-chee), for their work on a vaccine.

A study published by U.S. researchers last week concluded an experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe and triggered signs of immune protection in volunteers who tested it.

Obama’s request for money to confront Ebola is pending before Congress. White House spokesman Josh Earnest says lawmakers should “take prompt action on this.”

 

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