Indiana farmers facing tough planting decisions

FILE - This Jan. 30, 2014 file photo shows a farmer taking advantage of dry weather to till a field in preparation for spring planting near England, Ark. Congress has given its final approval to a sweeping five-year farm bill that provides food for the needy and subsidies for farmers. Ending years of political battles, the Senate vote Tuesday sends the measure to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
FILE - This Jan. 30, 2014 file photo shows a farmer taking advantage of dry weather to till a field in preparation for spring planting near England, Ark. Congress has given its final approval to a sweeping five-year farm bill that provides food for the needy and subsidies for farmers. Ending years of political battles, the Senate vote Tuesday sends the measure to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Agricultural experts say Indiana’s lingering cool spring will soon pose some tough choices for farmers waiting to plant their corn acreage.

Indiana’s weekly crop report says only 1 percent of Indiana’s corn crop had been planted by Sunday. That compares with the five-year average of 14 percent planted by the same date.

Purdue Extension agronomist Bob Nielsen says planting corn now is a moderate risk because Indiana’s 10-day forecast calls for more below-normal temperatures.

Nielsen says many farmers must soon decide whether to go ahead and plant corn or wait for warmer weather.

He says farmers who have thousands of acres to plant should probably go ahead and start planting, while those with small acreage might want to wait a week to let soils warm up.

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